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  • Naman Sharma

How did I get all 9s

Updated: Feb 2

Abstract: Access all my GCSE/A-level notes @ howtoget9s.com



Attaining the elusive grade 9 once is relatively straight-forward, provided you work hard in that one subject. This will probably be the subject you excel in; be it P.E, RS, French, Maths, etc.

Achieving 9s in all the subjects you enjoy is also manageable, as your interest in the subject will manifest itself in greater attentiveness and dedication.

Achieving grade 9s in all your GCSEs is a different story. It is no longer a case of doing well in what you enjoy. Now you have to work hard and do well in subjects you may not like ,or even, hate. That is the greatest challenge for those who want to achieve all 9s; to sustain high levels of diligence and focus in their disliked subjects. In other words, you have to apply the same attentiveness to all your subjects( more so to your weaker ones).


I don't care if you don't like that subject. Get a 9 in it and drop it. But work hard to get that 9 and creating the impression that you were good at that subject, in spite of your dislike towards it. Rather than living off the excuse of that particular subject being useless or irrelevant. Sixth forms, Unis and even Employers can see that a person does not have a good mentality if they give up, when it comes to something they don't like. Show that you always work hard and achieve accordingly.


Cutting to the chase; I achieved my grade 9s by:

Starting revision early - most people start during the Easter holidays, I started late February. A few more weeks of revision will build your confidence and mean that when exam season comes around, you will not need to spend late nights revising. Rather you will be able to fully recharge and be in the right state of mind .


Creating a revision plan: sitting down to revise without knowing what topics you will revise; will only mean that you will waste time and not absorb as much information as possible. Create a timetable with 26 min revision blocks with 4 min breaks for a maximum of 6-7 hours. A timetable will add structure and efficiency to your revision, both of which will substantially increase your results.


Active recall: The best revision often starts without notes and with checklists. You should aim to recall everything you already know by writing everything in the form of a mind-map or a list ,on a blank piece of paper (making sure to use your checklists to test your knowledge). Then look at your checklist and use your notes to fill any gaps in knowledge (preferably in a bright colour). After a day, try to recall the things you did not know previously. Repeat this recall strategy and you will be able to memorise information faster and more efficiently .


These are just a few tips I have to share. For more, please visit my website howtoget9s.com


I also made notes in a particular way, which helped improve my knowledge of a topic but not have to spend an extortionate amount of time revising. The underlying principle behind these notes were:

-Brevity : the ability to cut down useless information is key for any exam. Less is always easier to revise.

-Focus: investing time into aspects you struggle to understand rather doing what you like and find easy. Seek discomfort, when revising.

-Images, Acronyms, songs: create unique ways of revising by associating certain points with random things, which will allow you to memorise these points more easily. For example, learn the electromagnetic spectrum through an acronym. For example,

Gate X Usually Lets In Most Radiation.


These are a few tips on note making. To see more tips and access all my notes, please visit my website howtoget9s.com.


Naman Sharma

Dream, Believe, Achieve

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